Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 5, 2010-06-24

Coastal setbacks for the Mediterranean: a challenge for ICZM
(Abstract...)

The importance of monitoring and evaluation in adaptive maritime spatial planning
(Abstract...)

The integration of land and marine spatial planning
(Abstract...)

Ecotourism Potential of Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Coastal setbacks for the Mediterranean: a challenge for ICZM

Coastal development along the Mediterranean coast needs to be tackled with an integrated approach, in order to safeguard people and properties from extreme events, maintain environmental flows and ecosystems functions, protect coastal landscapes and ensure public accessibility to the shore. The complexity of the Mediterranean countries legal and administrative framework and its morphological heterogeneity make the implementation of the new ICZM Protocol provisions on coastal setback - claiming for a 100 m wide buffer zone where construction is not allowed - a challenge for the success of the initiative. European countries and the European Commission are party to the Protocol but the European legal framework lacks of specific provisions addressing the definition of coastal setbacks. Moreover, climate change, in terms of sea level rise and maritime climate, could play a major role in the future position of setback lines. While arbitrary setbacks should be put in place to halt short-term unwise coastal development, science can improve the identification of coastal setbacks by providing integrated methodologies to be implemented at the local level. The objective of this paper is to review concepts and practices in the use of coastal setbacks, in the context of the provisions of the ICZM Protocol and taking into account new challenges posed by climate change. A stepwise route map is proposed as a base to identify coastal setbacks, applicable to the Mediterranean region and elsewhere, to be used as a base to improve arbitrary setback approaches.

Keywords: Coastal development; Coastal setbacks; Arbitrary setbacks; Mediterranean Protocol on ICZM; Climate change; Methodological framework.

Source: Sanò, M., Marchand, M. and Medina, R. (2010); “Coastal setbacks for the Mediterranean: a challenge for ICZM”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, Vol. 14, No.1; Received: 29 April 2009; Revised: 17 September 2009; Accepted: 29 September 2009; Published online: 24 March 2010; This article had been previously published in issue 14:1, under DOI 10.1007/s11852-009-0075-6.

Contact: sanom@unican.es

Link: SpringerLink

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The importance of monitoring and evaluation in adaptive maritime spatial planning

Adaptive maritime spatial planning (MSP) uses monitoring and evaluation of the effectiveness of spatial and temporal management measures to promote understanding and improve planning and decision-making. An adaptive approach to MSP involves exploring alternative ways to meet management objectives, predicting the outcomes of alternative management measures, implementing one or more of these alternative management measures, monitoring to learn about the effects of management measures, and then using the results to update knowledge and adjust management actions. A monitoring and evaluation plan should be designed to be both cost effective and comprehensive. The process of setting and assessing performance metrics requires that the ecological and socio-economic objectives of the spatial management plan must be clearly stated up front for management actions to reflect those objectives accurately. To evaluate the effectiveness of a MSP plan, a range of ecological, socio-economic and institutional indicators need to be developed and monitored.

Keywords: Maritime (marine) spatial planning; Adaptive management; Monitoring Indicators; Evaluation; Management effectiveness.

Source: Douvere, F. and Ehler, C.N. (2010); “The importance of monitoring and evaluation in adaptive maritime spatial planning”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, Vol. 14, No. 1; Received: 23 August 2009; Revised: 19 March 2010; Accepted: 26 March 2010; Published online: 21 April 2010.

Contact: fanny.douvere@mac.com and charles.ehler@mac.com

Link: SpringerLink

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The integration of land and marine spatial planning

Whilst spatial planning has evolved as a tool to manage the development and use of the terrestrial environment over decades, the development of spatial planning systems for the marine environment are in their infancy. This paper focuses on the integration of land and marine based spatial planning systems. This is informed by a brief overview of the regional development of the lands and seas of Europe which underlie spatial planning systems and by a discussion of respective spatial planning systems in terms of economic sectors, land use, and sea use. The integration of spatial planning systems is then considered, followed by evaluation of relationships between spatial planning, and the wider field of environmental management. This includes consideration of organisational and geographical scales, technical management including legal aspects, policy, strategic planning and time scales of decision-making. The paper identifies the significant factors which must be considered in the integration of marine and terrestrial planning systems over the coming decades.

Keywords: Marine spatial planning; Land-use planning; Sea-use planning; ICM; Europe.

Source: Smith, H.D., Maes, F., Stojanovic, T.A. and Ballinger, R.C. (2010); “The integration of land and marine spatial planning”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, Vol. 14, No. 1; Received: 4 August 2009; Revised: 15 February 2010; Accepted: 26 March 2010; Published online: 20 April 2010.

Contact: timothy.stojanovic@st-andrews.ac.uk

Link: SpringerLink

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Ecotourism Potential of Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park

Ecotourism in protected areas is growing rapidly all around the world. Although the benefits of ecotourism are well described, it is not a panacea for solving the complex human needs and resource-capacity paradox in protected areas, unless it is well planned and managed. The notion of ecotourism in legally protected areas is relatively new in Turkey, and therefore none of Turkey's 39 national parks has an ecotourism master plan. The purpose of this study is to analyze the ecotourism potential and to generate initial recommendations for establishing an ecotourism framework for Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park (GPHNP) in Çanakkale, Turkey. Three basic research steps are followed: analysis, evaluation, and synthesis. Natural, cultural, and historical features of GPHNP are presented, and a set of recommendations are provided with respect to ecotourism in the study area. Results indicate that the national park has substantial potential for ecotourism activities such as bird-watching, photo safari, wildlife watching, sportfishing, bicycling, scuba diving, farming tourism, flora tourism, trekking, and horseback riding through nature; and this potential is not sufficiently utilized in the current context. The recommendations include that the national park's war history, biological diversity, coastal morphology, and climate should be promoted holistically, and awareness of them should be raised. The topography and other landscape attributes of the park must be protected and sustained.

Keywords: Çanakkale; Ecotourism; Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park; Turkey.

Source: Kelkit, A., Celik S. and Eşbah H. (2010); “Ecotourism Potential of Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park”, Journal of Coastal Research: Vol. 26, No. 3, Pages 562-568; Received: 2 January 2009; Accepted: 3 March 2009; Published Online: May 2010.

Contact: a_kelkit@yahoo.com

Link: Journal of Coastal Research

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