Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 20, 2011-02-01

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Services Valuation for Policy and Management: Managed Realignment Case Studies in England
(Abstract...)

Spatial Analysis of Recreational Boating as a First Key Step for Marine Spatial Planning in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)
(Abstract...)

To Preserve or to Develop? East Bay Dredging Project, South Caicos, Turks and Caicos Islands
(Abstract...)

Analysis of the Climate Change in Lithuanian Coastal Areas of the Baltic Sea
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Services Valuation for Policy and Management: Managed Realignment Case Studies in England

The recognition of the economic value of nature and the services it provides to humanity has become increasingly essential in the context of coastal zone management. In this paper we review the progress to date on both the necessary conceptual framework and empirical valuation studies required to bolster decision support systems (DSS) targeted at integrated coastal zone management goals. We highlight the importance of using an ecosystem services approach and recommend some basic sequential, although overlapping, analytical steps for appropriate environmental valuation and policy assessment: spatial explicitness; marginal changes; double counting; non-linearities; and threshold effects. We illustrate the practical use of the DSS by reviewing an existing UK case study on managed coastal realignment along the Eastern coast of England, and a new UK case study on managed realignment implemented in a southern area on the same coast. Comparing the two studies, the importance of spatial explicitness and the need for a sequential decision support system when dealing with ecosystem services valuation and project policy appraisal become particularly evident.

Keywords: Economic Value; Nature; Coastal Zone Management; Decision Support System (DSS); Valuation Studies; UK Case Studies.

Source: I. Bateman (2011); “Coastal and Marine Ecosystem Services Valuation for Policy and Management: Managed Realignment Case Studies in England“, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 54, Issue 3, March 2011, Pages 212-224; Available Online: 13 November, under DOI: 2010doi:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2010.11.003.

Contact: i.bateman@uea.ac.uk

Link: ScienceDirect

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Spatial Analysis of Recreational Boating as a First Key Step for Marine Spatial Planning in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)

Recreational boating is an important, growing leisure activity on the island of Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain. This spatial analysis of anchoring of recreational boating along the coast of Mallorca is intended to generate new data to contribute to the achievement of a comprehensive marine and coastal spatial planning on the island in addition to providing important information related to the pressure of increasing demand for anchoring space that, if not properly managed, could jeopardize the coastal and marine environments. The study combines data from the natural (habitats, geology), physical (wave patterns), and social sciences (survey interviews), using Geographic Information Systems (GIS) as the main analytical tool. The final result is an estimate of the average amount of seabed available for anchoring during the highest levels of boating activity in Mallorca (i.e. summer high season) based on a number of different sustainability scenarios (i.e. average distance between boats, weather conditions). In addition to being applicable to any location wishing to manage recreational boating activity, the methodology presented in this study represents an integrated, multidisciplinary approach which could be applied to a number of management scenarios with a spatial dimension in marine environments.

Keywords: Recreational Boating; Marine Spatial Planning; Mallorca; Geographic Information Systems (GIS).

Source: P. Balaguer, A. Diedrich, R. Sardá, M. Fuster, B. Cañellas and J. Tintoré (2011); “Spatial Analysis of Recreational Boating as a First Key Step for Marine Spatial Planning in Mallorca (Balearic Islands, Spain)”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 54, Issue 3, March 2011, Pages 241-249; Available Online: 13 December 2010, under DOI:10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2010.12.002.

Contact: pablo.balaguer@uib.es

Link: ScienceDirect

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To Preserve or to Develop? East Bay Dredging Project, South Caicos, Turks and Caicos Islands

The Turks and Caicos Islands are currently in the midst of an economic revolution from a marine-based provisional economy to a tourism economy. East Bay, South Caicos, is currently under construction with plans for a 160-unit condominium complex. Included in the project plan is removal of seagrass beds in front of the development to make a sandy beach for tourists. The aims of this study were to (i) describe the bathymetry and benthic habitat coverage of East Bay before dredging takes place and (ii) perform an economic valuation on the turtle grass beds that will be dredged using ecosystem valuation and emergy analysis techniques. The bathymetry survey revealed shallow waters (<1.5 m) until the reef drop off (∼650 m offshore). Benthic habitat exhibits zonation following the general progression: sand plain, algal plain, seagrass, coral rubble and seagrass, rock and turf algae, and reef flat. Ecosystem services valued the proposed dredging area at USD 28,807 per year, compared to emergy analysis, which valued the proposed dredging site at USD 32,060 per year. The baselines presented in the study may facilitate a quantitative assessment of dredging impacts on turtle grass once dredging is complete and an economical cost-benefit-analysis of the dredging project to see whether the economic gains outweigh the ecological costs of dredging in front of the East Bay development.

Keywords: Bathymetry; Benthic Habitat; Economic Valuation; Ecosystem Services; Emergy; Turks and Caicos Islands.

Source: C. Zuidema, R. Plate and A. Dikou (2011); “To Preserve or to Develop? East Bay Dredging Project, South Caicos, Turks and Caicos Islands”, Journal of Coastal Conservation; Received: 10 August 2009; Revised: 30 December 2010; Accepted: 4 January 2011; Published Online: 14 January 2011.

Contact: angeladikou@hotmail.com

Link: SpringerLink

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Analysis of the Climate Change in Lithuanian Coastal Areas of the Baltic Sea

This paper investigates the changes in the long-term hydroclimatic conditions in the SE Baltic Sea, along the Lithuanian coast, on the basis of the monitoring data obtained within a 45-year period (1961–2005). Furthermore, the paper discusses the processes behind those changes. Time series of relevant data along the Lithuanian coast from previous centuries were used to investigate climatic variability and trends. The study finds an increased period of westerly winds during winter. During recent decades, the impact of global climate change on sea-level rise has drawn wide interest, since the coastline changes have ecological, economic, and social impacts on the coastal areas of the Baltic Sea. The analysis of the trends for the Lithuanian coastal zone found results similar to those obtained from global and regional analyses showing increasing sea levels today and in the future.

Keywords: Baltic Sea; Sea-Level Rise; Wind Regime; Climate Change.

Source: I. Dailidienė, L. Davulienė, L. Kelpšaitė and A. Razinkovas (2011); “Analysis of the Climate Change in Lithuanian Coastal Areas of the Baltic Sea”, Journal of Coastal Research In-Press; Received: 24 May 2010; Accepted: 26 September 2010; Published Online: 6 January 2011, under DOI: 10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-10-00077.1

Contact: loreta@corpi.ku.lt

Link: jcronline

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