Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 49, 2012-11-01

Experts' evaluation of concepts of Ecologically Sustainable Development applied to coastal ecosystems
(Abstract...)

Framework and practice of integrated coastal zone management in Shandong Province, China
(Abstract...)

Enhancing science in coastal management through understanding its role in the decision making network
(Abstract...)

Predicted impact of the sea-level rise at Vellar–Coleroon estuarine region of Tamil Nadu coast in India: Mainstreaming adaptation as a coastal zone management option
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Experts' evaluation of concepts of Ecologically Sustainable Development applied to coastal ecosystems

With the broad aim of promoting the essential interdisciplinary research on sustainable development and contributing to the development of an operational bio-economic analysis, the present paper attempts to evaluate four representative approaches to Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD) in the context of coastal ecosystems. These approaches are non-declining utility per capita, preservation of all the existing natural capital, preservation of the biological crucial levels, and conservation of the critical natural capital. They reflect contemporary dialogue and especially the tension between the schools of strong and weak sustainability. The evaluation was performed by the international community of coastal experts through responses to a questionnaire survey (n = 99). It emerges that those approaches to ESD that integrate operational criteria and principles from natural sciences within the consideration of socio-economic welfare are evaluated as more functional as well as scientifically more appropriate for defining the target of ESD in coastal ecosystems.

Keywords: Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD); Coastal ecosystems; Experts’ evaluation.

Source: G. Mavrommati and C. Richardson (2012); “Experts' evaluation of concepts of Ecologically Sustainable Development applied to coastal ecosystems”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 69, December 2012, Pages 27 – 34; Available online: 21 July 2012, under DOI: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2012.07.016

Contact: geomavro@msu.edu

Link: ScienceDirect

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Framework and practice of integrated coastal zone management in Shandong Province, China

Integrated coastal zone management (ICZM), a modern coast management approach, provides a holistic solution to all kinds of coastal problems including geographical and political boundaries. The importance of integration in coastal management has also been recognized by coastal manager in China. In this paper, we present the ICZM framework and practices in Shandong as an example of China's ICZM on provincial level. Shandong is a coastal province in eastern China, which suffers from various coastal problems with the rapid socio-economic development in the past three decades. The framework of ICZM in Shandong, especially the legislation and administrative agencies, is described. Within this framework, the practice of ICZM, either planning or implementation, has been undertaken. It is shown that the ICZM is effective and partly solves the coastal problems. Finally, some challenges and drawbacks of current coastal zone management are also discussed.

Keywords: Framework; Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM); Shandong Province, China; Coastal problems.

Source: X.Q. Wu, M. Gao, D. Wang, Y. Wang, Q.S. Lu and Z.D. Zhang (2012); “Framework and practice of integrated coastal zone management in Shandong Province, China”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 69, December 2012, Pages 58 - 67; Available online: 14 August 2012, under DOI: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2012.07.030

Contact: gaomeng03@hotmail.com

Link: ScienceDirect

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Enhancing science in coastal management through understanding its role in the decision making network

There is an obvious need for comprehensive interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research programs that can assist in the management of marine and coastal environments. An ongoing problem is how to integrate this research into the ongoing development and evaluation of policy and management plans. A large scale systematic research program focused on the Ningaloo Coral Reef and its coastal terrestrial environment has been conducted. Many specific research projects were undertaken varying from bathymetry and fish behaviour to the needs and attitudes of tourists. Over fifty research projects were included. Integration of the findings is being achieved through a series of modelling activities of varying complexity including simple fish population models to a whole-of-system model. This paper provides an understanding of how this research fitted with the overall social system of interaction between decision makers and local stakeholders, and how the information could reach and be made relevant to all roles in regard to the management of Ningaloo. A network approach was developed through interviews and the construction of ego networks. The results of this study revealed clusters of groups that performed particular roles for reef management, and showed that the science cluster demonstrated the characteristics of the “Coordinator Role” within their own cluster but did not demonstrate the “Liaison Role” with other groups and only a low score for the representative “Brokerage Role”. The Research Liaison group was potentially able to reach the entire management system within three links, but it was evident that this potential was not necessarily being fully achieved. The advantages of understanding the role of science in wider decision-making networks are discussed in relation to the uptake of integrated research. Specifically, in this case, it was found that the scientists and key coordinating group for the program had fragile connections with the decision making community, which could have been strengthened by earlier systematic understanding of how the decision-making network operated.

Keywords: Science; Coastal Management; Decision-making network.

Source: G. J. Syme; P. Dzidic and J. M. Dambacher (2012); “Enhancing science in coastal management through understanding its role in the decision making network”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 69, December 2012, Pages 92 - 101; Available online: 23 August 2012, under DOI: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2012.08.012

Contact: g.syme@ecu.edu.au

Link: ScienceDirect

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Predicted impact of the sea-level rise at Vellar–Coleroon estuarine region of Tamil Nadu coast in India: Mainstreaming adaptation as a coastal zone management option

Low-lying coastal areas are more vulnerable to the impacts of climate change as they are highly prone for inundation to SLR (Sea-Level Rise). This study presents an appraisal of the impacts of SLR on the coastal natural resources and its dependent social communities in the low-lying area of Vellar–Coleroon estuarine region of the Tamil Nadu coast, India. Digital Elevation Model (DEM) derived from SRTM 90M (Shuttle Radar Topographic Mission) data, along with GIS (Geographic Information System) techniques are used to identify an area of inundation in the study site. The vulnerability of coastal areas in Vellar-Coleroon estuarine region of Tamil Nadu coast to inundation was calculated based on the projected SLR scenarios of 0.5 m and 1 m. The results demonstrated that about 1570 ha of the LULC (Land use and Land cover) of the study area would be permanently inundated to 0.5 m and 2407 ha for 1 m SLR and has also resulted in the loss of three major coastal natural resources like coastal agriculture, mangroves and aquaculture. It has been identified that six hamlets of the social communities who depend on these resources are at high-risk and vulnerable to 0.5 m SLR and 12 hamlets for 1 m SLR. From the study, it has been emphasized that mainstreaming adaptation options to SLR should be embedded within a coastal zone management and planning effort, which includes all coastal natural resources (ecosystem-based adaptation), and its dependent social communities (community-based adaptation) involved through capacity building.

Keywords: Sea-level Rise (SLR); Vellar–Coleroon estuarine region; Tamil Nadu coast in India; Mainstreaming adaptation; Coastal Zone Management.

Source: A. Saleem Khan; A. Ramachandran; N. Usha; S. Punitha and V. Selvam (2012); “Predicted impact of the sea-level rise at Vellar–Coleroon estuarine region of Tamil Nadu coast in India: Mainstreaming adaptation as a coastal zone management option”; Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 69, December 2012, Pages 327 - 339; Available online: 23 August 2012, under DOI: 10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2012.08.005

Contact: asaleemkhan.cc@gmail.com

Link: ScienceDirect

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