Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

In this issue Issue No. 64, 2014-02-01

Excogitated Coastal Tourism Competitiveness by Implementing Eco-tourism in Anyer, Banten, Indonesia
(Abstract...)

Incorporating uncertainty of future sea-level rise estimates into vulnerability assessment: A case study in Kahului, Maui
(Abstract...)

Assessing Current Conditions of Coastal Dune Systems of Mediterranean Developed Shores
(Abstract...)

Responding to coastal problems: Interactive knowledge development in a US nature restoration project
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Excogitated Coastal Tourism Competitiveness by Implementing Eco-tourism in Anyer, Banten, Indonesia

The aim of the research is to conserve Anyer coastal environment from negative environmental impact and improving coastal and coastline competitiveness by implementing the ecotourism concept. 216 data were collected by triangulation technique: open observation; structured interview, and interview, in the one-year Anyer sub-district and tabulated by content analysis based on ecotourism and competitiveness concepts with zoning and landscaping as well. It conserved spatial planning and decreased hospitality industry pollution and coral reef and seaweed as well as open new sea natural scenery, following coastline border regulation and conserve: coastal environment from utilizing coastal ecotourism activities. It also develops open new natural sea view and water recreation opportunity spectrum provided with water resources as an along the coastline zone, and coastal ecotourism attractions with undersea life.

Keywords: Ecotourism; Coastal tourism; Competitiveness; Zoning; Landscaping; Anyer.

Source: H. S. Halim (2014); “Excogitated Coastal Tourism Competitiveness by Implementing Eco-tourism in Anyer, Banten, Indonesia”, International Journal of Marine Science, 2014, Vol. 4, No. 7, DOI: 10.5376/ijms.2014.04.0007; Received: 6 November 2013; Accepted: 6 December 2013; Published: 8 January 2014.

Contact: hengky_halim@yahoo.com.au

Link: IJMS

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Incorporating uncertainty of future sea-level rise estimates into vulnerability assessment: A case study in Kahului, Maui

Accurate sea-level rise (SLR) vulnerability assessments are essential in developing effective management strategies for coastal systems at risk. In this study, we evaluate the effect of combining vertical uncertainties in Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) elevation data, datum transformation and future SLR estimates on estimating potential land area and land cover loss, and whether including uncertainty in future SLR estimates has implications for adaptation decisions in Kahului, Maui. Monte Carlo simulation is used to propagate probability distributions through our inundation model, and the output probability surfaces are generalized as areas of high and low probability of inundation. Our results show that considering uncertainty in just LiDAR and transformation overestimates vulnerable land area by about 3% for the high probability threshold, resulting in conservative adaptation decisions, and underestimates vulnerable land area by about 14% for the low probability threshold, resulting in less reliable adaptation decisions for Kahului. Not considering uncertainty in future SLR estimates in addition to LiDAR and transformation has variable effect on SLR adaptation decisions depending on the land cover category and how the high and low probability thresholds are defined. Monte Carlo simulation is a valuable approach to SLR vulnerability assessments because errors are not required to follow a Gaussian distribution.

Keywords: Sea-level rise (SLR); Vulnerability assessments; Coastal management strategies.

Source: Sea-level rise (SLR); Vulnerability assessments; Coastal management strategies.

Contact: hcooper2013@fau.edu

Link: Journal of Climate Change

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Assessing Current Conditions of Coastal Dune Systems of Mediterranean Developed Shores

A method of assessment was developed to evaluate the current condition and function of dunes in developed coastal tourist areas of the Mediterranean. The aim was to identify a procedure for differentiating between more and less valuable dune systems. The method was tested on the Costa Brava (Catalonia, NE Spain) and may prove useful for designing conservation and management strategies for coastal dunes in developed areas. The evaluation method was based on a set of 12 indicators relating to three aspects that we consider fundamental for the management of dune landscapes: dune morphology (dune landforms) associated with the evolution of the dune system, dune vegetation, and human impacts. The assessment was tested on each of the 34 existing dune systems of the Costa Brava. Cluster analysis provided a classification into five groups differentiated by characteristics of morphological development, total number of dune-restricted plant species, and degree of human impact suffered. The best evaluation was achieved by the indicators of morphological development, with 76% of the dune systems rating above average. On the other hand, only 42% of the systems rated above average in the indicator of dune-restricted plant species. The worst results came from the indicators of human impact, with only three beaches rating above average in this respect. The evaluation has shown the Costa Brava dune systems to be in a precarious state of conservation because most systems are located on urban or suburban beaches. The best-conserved areas were the larger dune systems located on seminatural or semiurban beaches, where human pressure is weaker. The procedure described in this article provides a useful tool for coastal managers to assess changes in the state of their dune systems over time and to focus their management policies on the protection of systems under the greatest threat.

Keywords: Assessment; Coastal Dune Systems; Coastal tourist areas; the Mediterranean.

Source: J. Pintó, C. Martí and R. M. Fraguell (2014); “Assessing Current Conditions of Coastal Dune Systems of Mediterranean Developed Shores”, Journal of Coastal Research, In-Press (Online ahead of print) under DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2112/JCOASTRES-D-13-00116.1; Received: 28 May 2013; Accepted: 7 October 2013; Revised: 16 December 2013; Published Online: 7 January 2014.

Contact: josep.pinto@udg.edu

Link: JCR

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Responding to coastal problems: Interactive knowledge development in a US nature restoration project

Coastal decision-making is impacted by global climate change and region-specific changes related to population growth, economic activities and the natural environment. This results in complex and interdependent problems. Addressing these problems requires the involvement of decision-makers, researchers and other societal actors in knowledge production. However, such means of knowledge production are poorly understood when it comes to coastal regions. Using a conceptual framework that makes a distinction between project arrangements and knowledge arrangements, this paper analyses interactive knowledge development in a nature restoration project on the US West Coast. The project adopted a collaborative approach, and involved diverse organisations in developing knowledge for reaching its restoration solutions. The case study analysis results in seven causal mechanisms. The mechanisms are divided into two groups. One group discusses processes that affect interactive knowledge development, such as the need for public support. The other group explains how interactive knowledge development functions, for example through facilitation and the creation of safe environments for researchers and regulators. Through identifying these mechanisms, this paper contributes to an improved understanding of interactive knowledge development in coastal regions.

Keywords: Coastal problems; Decision-making; Global climate change; US West Coast.

Source: C. Seijger; J. van Tatenhove; G. Dewulf and H. S. Otter (2014); “Responding to coastal problems: Interactive knowledge development in a US nature restoration project”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 89, March 2014, Pages 29–38; Available Online under http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2013.12.011

Contact: c.j.l.seijger@utwente.nl

Link: ScienceDirect

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