Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

Current issue Issue No. 118, 2018-08-01

Management preferences and attitudes regarding environmental impacts from seawater desalination: Insights from a small coastal community
(Abstract...)

Action on climate change requires deliberative framing at local governance level
(Abstract...)

Understanding museum vacationers' eco-friendly decision-making process: strengthening the VBN framework
(Abstract...)

Assessing causal links in fish stock-recruitment relationships
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Management preferences and attitudes regarding environmental impacts from seawater desalination: Insights from a small coastal community

The use of seawater desalination as a water supply option is increasing worldwide. Compared to other marine sectors, studies on marine users' perceptions and attitudes towards this new sector and its impacts on marine ecosystems are very limited. This study assessed differences in coastal stakeholder groups' preferences for managing marine impacts of a seawater desalination plant in a small coastal community. The majority of respondents placed high importance on the marine ecosystem, including ecosystem features that are less visible and charismatic, and were highly concerned about potential impacts on marine ecosystems and marine activities from the new desalination facility. Coastal residents further rated multiple management measures to reduce and off-set marine impacts as highly important, but indicated a lack of trust in institutions involved in regulating and managing environmental impacts. Logistic regression revealed that lack of institutional trust and concerns about marine impacts were significant predictors of opposition to the desalination facility and appeared to play a critical role in shaping local attitudes towards desalination. Findings further revealed that local opinions were primarily shaped by how respondents used the nearby marine system, and by gender. Age, education, and race did not seem to shape local opinions. At the same time, there were differences between consumptive and non-consumptive marine user groups' opinions indicating the potential for conflict regarding the most important management strategies.

Keywords: Public perception; Marine impacts; Management preferences; Marine users; Desalination.

Source: N. Heck, A. Paytan, D.C. Potts, B. Haddad and K. Lykkebo Petersen (2018); “Management preferences and attitudes regarding environmental impacts from seawater desalination: Insights from a small coastal community”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 163, 1 September 2018, pp. 22-29; Received: 14 January 2018; Revised: 24 May 2018; Accepted: 31 May 2018; Available Online: 6 June 2018, under https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0964569118300358?via%3Dihub

Contact: nheck@ucsc.edu

Link: ScienceDirect

back

Action on climate change requires deliberative framing at local governance level

Despite successful examples of multilevel government leadership on climate change policy, many local officials still face a variety of barriers, including low public support, low resources, and political division. But perhaps most significant is lack of public discussion about climate change. We propose deliberative framing as a strategy to open the silence, bridge political division, identify common and divergent interests and values, and thereby devise collective responses to climate change.

Keywords: Climate change; Deliberative framing.

Source: R. Romsdahl, G. Blue and A. Kirilenko (2018); “Action on climate change requires deliberative framing at local governance level”, Climatic Change, pp. 1-11; First Online: 11 July 2018, under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10584-018-2240-0

Contact: romsdahl@aero.und.edu

Link: Climatic Change

back

Understanding museum vacationers' eco-friendly decision-making process: strengthening the VBN framework

In the present research, the process of vacationers’ pro-environmental decision formation for environmentally responsible museums was examined. This research employed and broadened the value-belief-norm theory, using satisfaction with green product use, green trust, and frequency of past behaviour for green product use as predictors. A structural equation modelling was utilized for modelling comparisons and hypothesis testing. A measurement model tested using the data gathered at museums was found to satisfactorily fit to the data. Newly integrated constructs significantly improved the prediction power of the theory. In addition, results of the structural equation modelling generally supported the proposed relationships. Moreover, a salient role of moral norm was identified. As expected, new environmental paradigm, awareness of consequences, ascribed responsibility, and moral norm played an important mediating role. A parsimonious model with greater prediction power than the original value-belief-norm theory was produced through modelling comparisons and the process of testing relationships among research variables. Our results offer a sufficient understanding of vacationers’ pro-environmental intention for eco-friendly museums.

Keywords: Value-belief-norm theory; Museum vacationers; Satisfaction with green product use; Green trust; Frequency of past behaviour for green product use.

Source: Heesup Han, Hossein G. T. Olya, Sun-bai Cho and Wansoo Kim (2018); “Understanding museum vacationers' eco-friendly decision-making process: strengthening the VBN framework”, Journal of Sustainable Tourism, Volume 26, 2018 - Issue 6, pp. 855-872; Published Online: 30 April 2018; Received: 11 January 2017; Accepted: 7 August 2017; Published Online: 30 April 2018, under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2017.1377210

Contact: warooo@dau.ac.kr

Link: Journal of Sustainable Tourism

back

Assessing causal links in fish stock-recruitment relationships

Understanding whether recruitment fluctuations in fish stock arise from stochastic forcing (e.g. environmental variations) rather than deterministic forces (e.g. intrinsic dynamics) is a long standing question with important applied consequences for fisheries ecology. In particular, the relationship between recruitment, spawning stock biomass and environmental factors is still poorly understood, even though this aspect is crucial for fisheries management. Fisheries data are often short, but arise from complex dynamical systems with a high degree of stochastic forcing, which are difficult to capture through classic modelling approaches. In the present study, recent statistical approaches based on the approximation of the attractors of dynamical systems are applied on a large dataset of time series to assess (i) the directionality of potential causal relationships between recruitment and spawning stock biomass and potential influence of sea-surface temperature on recruitment and (ii) their performance to forecast recruitment. Our study shows that (i) whereas spawning stock biomass and sea surface temperature influence the recruitment to a lesser extent, recruitment causes also parental stock size and (ii) that non-linear forecasting methods performed well for the short-term predictions of recruitment time series. Our results underline that the complex and stochastic nature of the processes characterizing recruitment are unlikely to be captured by classical stock-recruitment relationships, but that non-linear forecasting methods provide interesting perspectives in that respect.

Keywords: Fish stock; Recruitment fluctuations; Causal links.

Source: M. Pierre, T. Rouyer, S. Bonhommeau and J.M. Fromentin (2017); “Assessing causal links in fish stock-recruitment relationships”, ICES Journal of Marine Science, Volume 75, Issue 3, 1 May 2018, pp. 903-911; Received: 20 December 2016; Revision Received: 9 October 2017; Accepted: 10 October 2017; Published: 3 November 2017 under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1093/icesjms/fsx202

Contact: maud.pierre@irstea.fr

Link: ICES Journal of Marine Science

back

NEWSLETTER

To subscribe to 'Mediterranean Coastal Alert' click HERE.
To unsubscribe from 'Mediterranean Coastal Alert', click HERE.