Welcome to PAP/RAC Mediterranean Coastal Alert! This newsletter is regularly updated monthly. It contains abstracts of selected current articles and archives on various environmental themes, in particular those dealing with all aspects of coastal issues. The selection is made from the articles published in the leading international scientific journals. This newsletter is an excellent way of keeping you updated with coastal studies and processes.

Current issue Issue No. 114, 2018-04-02

Revealing the transversal continuum of natural landscapes in coastal zones - Case of the Turkish Mediterranean coast
(Abstract...)

European Atlas of the Seas: “a picture is worth a thousand words”
(Abstract...)

Resilience of Touristic Island Beaches under Sea Level Rise: A Methodological Framework
(Abstract...)

Land, Water, and Wind Watershed Cycle: a strategic use of water, land and wind for climate change adaptation
(Abstract...)

Abstract

Revealing the transversal continuum of natural landscapes in coastal zones - Case of the Turkish Mediterranean coast

The study presents an analytical framework for examining the transversal structure, rather than the longitudinal pattern of the landscape in coastal zones. Our methodology introduces the concept of the “band” as an alternative to the “buffer zone”. The Band is a dynamic notion which is rooted in the organic structure of landscape patterns and which relies on the order of adjacency/connectivity between land cover patches and the coastline. The study utilizes CORINE Land Cover data to produce 10 bands that stretch along the Turkish Mediterranean coast. By introducing two extra attributes: “band level” and “transversal continuum depth”, this method is useful for the identification of; (i) transversally connected coastal natural landscape mosaics, (ii) endangered natural landscape patches to be conserved, and (iii) potential artificial surfaces to be restored. The workflow is formalized via Model Builder (ArcGIS), and is applicable to any coastal context in support of diverse decision making processes such as those of Integrated Coastal Zone Management (ICZM).

Keywords: Coastal landscapes conservation; Bands of coastal landscapes; CORINE; ICZM; Model Builder.

Source: A. Hysa, F. A. Türer Başkaya (2018); “Revealing the transversal continuum of natural landscapes in coastal zones - Case of the Turkish Mediterranean coast”, Ocean & Coastal Management, Volume 158, 15 May 2018, Pages: 103-115; available under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ocecoaman.2018.03.011

Contact: artanh@gmail.com

Link: ScienceDirect

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European Atlas of the Seas: “a picture is worth a thousand words”

The European Atlas of the Seas offers a snapshot of environmental and socio-economic features that characterize the coastal and marine environment. The latest release (Version 4) addresses the public in general, but also non-specialist experts involved with environmental issues, human activities or policies related to Europe’s coasts and seas. The information content of the Atlas comprises a series of geographical layers, subdivided in “background maps”, “thematic maps” (i.e. maritime Europe, natural setting, sea bottom, sea level rise, security, transport, tourism, energy, wind, fisheries and fish consumption) and “do-it-yourself maps” (dealing with marine knowledge, nature and environment, socio-economics, fisheries, aquaculture, transport, energy, sea bed mining, coastal tourism, Maritime Spatial Planning, integrated maritime surveillance, and international ocean governance). All maps follow consistent cartographic rules and can be extracted for external use. The Atlas database is updated regularly, but historical data remain accessible after the updates, so that time series may be constructed. Tools for map exploration and combination can be used to combine together more layers, providing professional users with analysis and interpretation capabilities, to couple data into graphical indicators. The Atlas aims to supports also policy making, on marine environment, maritime issues and economic sectors, both within and outside the European Institutions (e.g. on Common Fisheries Policy or Maritime Spatial Planning). Further, it expands the same support to near-coastal issues and matters related to land-sea interactions. The web application for accessing Atlas contents offers links to other Marine Information Systems, and is available to a broad audience from computers, tablets and mobile devices.

Keywords: Atlas European seas; Coastal and marine environment; Maritime socio-economics.

Source: V. Barale, J. Dusart, M. Assouline and F. Niceta (2018); “European Atlas of the Seas: “a picture is worth a thousand words”, Journal of Coastal Conservation, February 2018, Volume 22, Issue 1, Pages: 105 - 113; First online: 15 September 2017 under DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s11852-017-0560-2

Contact: Vittorio.BARALE@ec.europa.eu

Link: Journal of Coastal Conservation

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Resilience of Touristic Island Beaches under Sea Level Rise: A Methodological Framework

This contribution addresses the need for a simple model for managers to employ when planning strategies for the management of touristic beaches under sea level rise. A methodological framework was developed and tested in two Aegean archipelago islands (Lesvos and Rhodes, Greece). The scheme can represent the status of touristic island beaches, based on easily obtained variables/indicators and projections of beach erosion/retreat under different scenarios of mean sea level rise (MSLR) and extreme events. Information on beach geomorphological characteristics, environmental setting, water quality, management, and services (such as those used in the “Blue Flag” classification) was collated/collected and beach erosion/retreat due to CV&C was estimated through suitable ensembles of cross-shore (1-D) morphodynamic models. A Strength-Weaknesses-Opportunities-Threats (SWOT) framework was employed to assist in the selection of indicators and multicriteria analysis used to optimize indicator weights and rank beaches according to their sustainability under sea level rise. Implementation of the framework at the two islands has shown that: the majority of Lesvos and Rhodes beaches (82% of a total of 217 beaches and 58% of a total of 97 beaches, respectively) can be classified as beaches with no, or minimal, human interference, suggesting that under environmentally sound coastal management further touristic development might be afforded; there could be very significant effects of the sea level rise on the carrying and buffering capacities of the most developed (“Blue Flag”) beaches, with some expected even under conservative projections to be completely eroded by 2100, unless technical adaptation measures are taken; and using the proposed framework, touristic beaches can be rapidly ranked in terms of their resilience to sea level rise and their development potential, allowing prioritization of effective management responses.

Keywords: Beach management; Blue flag classification; Beach erosion; Climate variability and change; Morphodynamic models; Analytical hierarchy process.

Source: O. Tzoraki, I. N. Monioudi, A. F. Velegrakis, N. Moutafis, G. Pavlogeorgatos and D. Kitsiou (2018); “Resilience of Touristic Island Beaches Under Sea Level Rise: A Methodological Framework”, Coastal Management, Volume 46, Issue 2, Pages: 78 - 102; Available under DOI: 10.1080/08920753.2018.1426376

Contact: rania.tzoraki@aegean.gr

Link: Coastal Management Journal

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Land, Water, and Wind Watershed Cycle: a strategic use of water, land and wind for climate change adaptation

The increase in population and the improvement of life standards are stretching the boundaries between water-energy-land management, and demanding innovative and holistic solutions. This article proposes an approach for increasing the water availability of two or more water basins taking into consideration land use and wind patterns, and was named Land, Water, and Wind Watershed Cycle (L3WC). This approach can be applied to one watershed or a combination of watersheds. In the first case, if wind patterns blow mainly in the opposite direction of the main river flow, plantations with high water demand should be focused on the lowest part of the basin. The transpired moisture would then return to the basin with the wind and possibly increase the water availability of the basin. Applying this method to a series of basins, water is transposed from one basin to another, used for irrigated agriculture, returned to the atmosphere with evapotranspiration and pushed back to the basin where the water was extracted by the wind. Case studies of this methodology are presented in the São Francisco basin and between the Tocantins, Amazonas, and Paraná basins and the São Francisco basin in Brazil. The São Francisco basin was selected because it is located in a dry region, its flow has considerably reduced in the past decade and because the trade winds blow constantly from the ocean into the continent all year around. L3WC is a strategy to plan the allocation of water consumption in a watershed, taking into account wind patterns to support the sustainable development of a region. It has the potential of increasing water availability and creating a climate change adaptation mechanism to control the climate and reduce vulnerability to climatic variations.

Keywords: Land, water and wind watershed; Climate change adaptation.

Source: J. D. Hunt and W. Leal Filho (2018); “Land, Water, and Wind Watershed Cycle: a strategic use of water, land and wind for climate change adaptation”, Climatic Change, April 2018, Volume 147, Issue 3 – 4, Pages: 427–439; First online: 6 March 2018; Received: 25 July 2017; Accepted: 16 February 2018;

Contact: w.leal@mmu.ac.uk

Link: Climate Change Journal

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